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Have been reading a book about the history of philosophy and don’t really know why, it is interesting moving from the Scholastic medieval period where philosophy had a deep connection to theology and the classics. As we move into the modern period we tend to get more original thinking and individuality. I remember a lecture at Uni on art where we finally got to Durer and him as an individual was a focus. Not to say there were not individuals in the periods prior but it was more schools of thought and artistry or in the case of philosophy scholasticism. If you look at Descartes and later Kant they were building systems that moved away from classical thinking, I think it was Pascal who told how little he had actually read of the classics, he was a Christian who pushed scientific methods and was willing to discover and refute classical ideas toward applied sciences. In Pascals case he was a mathematician and inventor like Galileo but maybe a little more careful in broadcasting his ideas. What I found interesting was how a lot of work was published anonymously so it does seem strange that new ideas had to be cloaked in many cases the true author revealed after their death especially after what happened to some staunch researchers. In the 16th century with new lands discovered and the cultures becoming known many people were willing to question dominant ideas. Have to admit the book just seems to never end and really have to force myself to read it but just keeping at it because at least it gives me some vague ideas if I ever pick up a philosophy book in the future.

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